In make me a sandwich, provided that we interpret it in the non-pleasant way, the pronoun me is the indirect object: it refers to the person who takes advantage of the plot by receiving the sandwich. The noun sandwich is the direct object: it is the thing that is done. For a selection of other transtrans-transtranssive verbs, you can give people a break, send them a card, help them, show them love, do them a favor, write them an email, or tell them a joke. The joke « Make me a sandwich » throws the spotlight on a third class of verbs called ditransitives. They take not only a direct object that runs through the action, but a so-called indirect object that always stands in front of the direct object and usually refers to someone who is enjoying the plot. « How, » you say? Enter, grammatical jokes! You see, using grammar jokes can be a fun and effective way to remind us of these countless rules. Reader`s Digest has put together a list of jokes that every grammar geek and hopefully those who aren`t enjoy. All of our previous examples of results have used adjectives to show how the direct object ended: orange, stupid, crazy, cold, angry, happy, proud, and ashamed. But some resulting verbs allow you to use noun phrases as well as adjectives. For example, you can elect someone to the presidency or call your pet iguan Jubjub. Make can do the same, in sentences like you made me the happiest man in the world, or it makes you an accomplice. That`s what poof! You`re a sandwich! Possible joke is the existence of another class of verbs, known as results. This kind of verb takes a direct object as well as a word or sentence that describes how the direct object ends.

For example, turn is a resultatal verb in the phrase Industrial runoff made the stream orange. The direct object is the stream, and Orange is an adjective that tells us what the stream looked like. For other examples of result verbs, you can ridicule people, drive them crazy, or leave them indifferent. Make is also a result verb; They can make people angry, happy, or proud or ashamed. Opaque verbs only need one subject. For example, the whole rover barked the Rover subject, but no direct object. Many verbs can be either transitive or opaque. For example, the food is opaque in the earth pig is the food, but it is transitive in the earth pig is eating Squiggly`s chocolate. Admit it — grammar is not everyone`s expertise. From spelling, collocation, punctuation, and seemingly endless guidelines for correct subject-verb correspondence, the English language is plagued by too many rules that simply seem impossible to remember at once. . .

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